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'The important thing is to never stop questioning' - Albert Einstein

What makes a good Scientist?

The ability to think independently and raise questions about working scientifically and the knowledge and skills that it brings.  Confidence and competence in the full range of practical skills, taking the initiative in, for example, planning and carrying out scientific investigations. Excellent scientific knowledge and understanding which is demonstrated in written and verbal explanations, solving challenging problems and reporting scientific findings.  High levels of originality, imagination or innovation in the application of skills.  The ability to undertake practical work in a variety of contexts, including fieldwork.  A passion for science and its application in past, present and future technologies.  

These are the principles in which we embed our scientific curriculum;  enthusing our children in the wonderful world of Science.   

Our scientific enquiry process

Exploring, observing, discussing leads to….

Questions 

Which leads to…

The 5 types of working scientifically 

Fair testing

Observing changes over time

Pattern seeking

Research 

Identification and classification 

Which leads to evidence which leads to conclusions. And often more questions. 

Science Learning Partnership

We look at aspirational people

Marie Curie 

Because of Scientific work by Marie and Pierre Curie, x-rays became available for use in diagnosing and treating medical problems, including everything from broken bones to cancer.

Amazingly, Marie Curie herself helped with medical aid during World War One; she made sure that ambulances contained the necessary x-rays, even driving them to the battlefields herself.

These acts earned her the place as head of radiology for the International Red Cross.

war ambulance

Science through a good book

The digeastive system!

Scientific Vocabulary

Scientific vocabulary by the end of year 6

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